Twin tower downtown project ready to go?

Developer Jeff Greene says he’s ready to start building One West Palm, his $250 million, two-tower office/hotel/apartment project that won city approval in January 2016.

In recent months, Greene has been waiting for approval of its foundation plans, the complex underpinnings for the site at 550 Quadrille Blvd. Now he could pull the permit and get started “tomorrow, if I wanted,” he said Wednesday.

He’s waiting for the Federal Aviation Administration to approve the buildings’ 30-story height but is confident that won’t be a problem, since there are other tall buildings nearby.

“I may not wait for that,” he said, adding he’s finalizing contractor selections and the numbers add up well.

“I’m ready to go with it. I’ve run the ribbon so it works for me.”

The sister towers, designed by Miami’s Arquitectonica, would be the tallest in the city.

The plan calls for shops, restaurants and corner parks at street level. The glassy office tower will contain 200,000 square feet of Class A office space and 200 luxury hotel suites.

The adjacent tower, which will house 326 apartments, echoes the office tower’s block-like design but is a bit shorter.

The complex will feature a top-flight restaurant, a day-care center, a 34,000-square-foot fitness center with putting green and indoor tennis courts, in addition to the complex’s outdoor courts, Greene said.

City officials and business development boosters have been pressing for construction of more top-tier office buildings downtown. They say that existing office buildings are full and that companies considering moving to the city have gone elsewhere as a result.

New York-based Related Cos., developer of CityPlace, has been trying to get the city to change its downtown zoning so that Related can build a 25-story office tower near the waterfront, off Okeechobee Boulevard. Current zoning, established by a public vote, allows a maximum of five stories there.

Meanwhile the city has commissioned a mobility study to address the worsening congestion brought on by development.