Why is Val Kilmer coming to West Palm Beach?

Actor, writer and director Val Kilmer is scheduled to appear at Palm Beach Improv July 9, to introduce a screening of his one-man play about Huckleberry Finn- and Tom Sawyer-author Samuel Clemens.

The show, Citizen Twain, played to sold-out houses in Los Angeles and now Kilmer will present the West Palm Beach screening of his directorial debut about Clemens and his writings as Mark Twain.

Samuel Clemens, 1835-1910.

Kilmer, who appeared in Top Gun, Batman Forever and The Doors, will introduce the 90-minute film and conduct a question and answer period with the audience afterward.

VIP ticket holders will have an opportunity to chat with him after the Q&A.

The show starts at 7 p.m. General admission is $30. VIP tickets are $70. Open to 21 and over, two-drink minimum. Visit http://www.palmbeachimprov.com for more information. Palm Beach Improv is in CityPlace, at 550 S Rosemary Ave.

Game night 6 p.m. Monday on waterfront green

Aesop’s Tables. (Contributed)

Blogger, Tweeter and international man of mystery Aaron Wormus will host a free community game night at 6 p.m. Monday, June 26, at West Palm Beach’s waterfront green.

Wormus, the “guy” behind the aGuyonClematis Twitter account and blog, will lead the event at the city’s outdoor art exhibition, Aesop’s Tables, where picnic tables are painted with themes of Aesop’s fables.

Equipped with silly games, ice breaker activities and prizes, Wormus will warm us with all things fun while showcasing the exhibition, created by 19 local artists.

For information about Aesop’s Tables and other West Palm Beach summer events, visit wpb.org/events.

Aaron Wormus, fresh from a morning bath at a nuclear waste dump.

 

 

Coming events: 4th on Flagler, block parties and “Forecast Extreme”

Fireworks light up the waterfront. (Richard Graulich / The Palm Beach Post)

Fourth on Flagler, one of South Florida’s largest Independence Day events, returns to the waterfront Tuesday, July 4, 5 p.m. to 10 p.m.. The free event will feature a military honor ceremony, larger-than-life games like human foosball and giant Jenga, as well as an art exhibition, live music, and an 18-minute fireworks display.

Guests can also tee-off on the tropical-themed Glow-Fore-It, a 9-hole glow-in-the-dark mini golf course along the Intracoastal Waterday.Children can also create their own life-size fairy tale using giant cut-outs of traditional storybook characters in StoryVille or engage in crafts and games. For a complete schedule, please visit: http://wpb.org/events.

Community members will gather for an in-depth discussion on the impact of the local opioid crisis Wednesday, June 28, at 5:30 p.m. Presented by the Jewish Community Relations Council of the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County, featured speakers are State Attorney David Aronberg and Alexa Lee, Director of Programs at the Palm Beach County Substance Awareness Coalition. They will discuss the growing issue of opioids use in Palm Beach County and how the community can help.

The event takes place at the Federation, 4601 Community Drive.

The Teens Unite! Summer Block Party Series brings together teens from West Palm’s many neighborhoods to socialize and enjoy the summer in a positive environment. The series, free for young men and women ages 12-to-18, runs every Saturday night from 7 p.m. to 10 p.m. through July 29. Teens can enjoy free food, a video game truck, DJ, basketball, talent shows, pool parties, and dance parties.

The June 24 block party takes place at The Salvation Army; 600 N. Rosemary Ave. July 1 it’s at De George Boys & Girls Club; 4105 Pinewood Ave. Student ID is required. A dress code of ‘no hoodies and no hats’ will be enforced. Parents are welcome. For more information, contact Kevin Jones at 561-822-1413.

The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium presents “Forecast Extreme” June 24, in which local amateur radio groups prepare for hurricane season with kid-friendly, interactive activities. Safety and weather experts will give presentations, and children will have the opportunity to make weather-related arts and crafts. Guests will be able to interact with local HAM radio operators and see how these operators communicate. The program is from 2 p.m. – 6 p.m. at the science museum, 4801 Dreher Trail North.

All activities are included with paid Science Center admission. Adults are $15, children ages 3-12 are $11, seniors ages 60 and up are $13 and members are free. For information, call 561-832-1988 or visit http://www.sfsciencecenter.org.

Downtown Showdown seafood fest and fishing tournament set for this weekend

 

The 3rd Annual Downtown Showdown KDW fishing tournament and saltwater festival is coming up on Saturday, May 20th from 11 a.m. – 8 p.m.

The free event is one of the biggest fishing tournaments ever held on the West Palm Beach waterfront. It also includes the West Palm Beach Seafood Festival, a classic and custom car show, live music, local vendors, kid zone and more.

For information, visit downtownshowdownkdw.com.

Heart & Soul Fest heats up Historic Northwest tonight

Heart & Soul Fest returns today, April 22 from 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. in the Historic Northwest District, across from the legendary Sunset Lounge

The free event, at Rosemary Avenue and 8th Street features music, soul food and family activities including arts and crafts, face painting, a children’s dance contest, crowd trivia, a health fair and parades.

 

 

The entertainment will include R&B star Chanté Moore, along with local bands Deep Fried Funk, Zion’s Sons Gospel Choir, and Faith’s Place.  There will be activities for the entire family with and more.  Local vendors will dish up tasty soul food including favorites like BBQ ribs, pulled pork, fried chicken, and mac and cheese.

 

Free shuttle service and parking is available in the Palm Beach County Judicial and Governmental Center Parking lot on Banyan Boulevard at Rosemary Avenue.

Entertainment Schedule

All day              Heath Fair

1:30 – 2:15      Parade – Faith’s Place Marching Band and Steel Drummers
2:30 – 3:00      Senior Fit Tips
3:30 – 4:00      Natural Movers Dance Party
4:15 – 5:00      Zion’s Sons Gospel Choir
5:00 – 5:15      Children’s Dance Contest
5:30 – 6:15      Deep Fried Funk
6:30 – 8:00      Chanté Moore

 

 

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Reshaping West Palm’s Historic Northwest

This announcement, from the Black Chamber of Commerce of Palm Beach County:

Historic Northwest Rising Build Activity & Block Party

Date: April 22.
Time: 8 a.m. – 10 p.m.
Enjoy a fun weekend of experimenting with what the Sunset Lounge and the open space could look like!  Help create sample installations of improvements including benches, tables, street art, and more.

Family fun: Street Mural Painting, Obstacle Course, Games, Vendors, and more. This event is in conjunction with the Heart and Soul Festival.

Sign up to Volunteer and learn more at www.northwestrising.com or contact The Mosaic Group at info@upscalebymosaic.com or 561.651.9565.

  • Friday April 21:

9 a.m. -noon: Help Create an Obstacle Course for Kids.

  • 4 p.m. – 9 p.m.: Help Make Crosswalk Art and Shaded Areas.
  • Saturday, April 22:
  • 8 a.m. – noon: Help with Final Touches and Multi-Purpose Game Court.
  • 8 p.m. – 10 p.m.: Clean up

Volunteers will meet at the Sunset Lounge, located at 609 8th St.

What did the consultants say about your neighborhood?

West Palm Beach’s urban planning consultants, Gehl Studio, this week released recommendations on how to bring the downtown and neighborhood scenes to life. For downtown, the challenge the consultants saw was that, the second you step off Clematis Street, or away from CityPlace, walkways are uninviting and that breaks up the connectivity that makes it fun to go from one place to another.

Not enough shade trees, street lighting or bicycling facilities; too many obstructions like utility posts blocking the sidewalks. Big roadways like Okeechobee Boulevard and Tamarind Avenue act as barriers. Flagler Drive blocks the waterfront.

The urban planners came up with proposals for pilot projects for six areas, from just south to just north of downtown. The city commission will be considering these recommendations in the weeks to come. We plan a full story about this for this weekend, but for now, here’s a neighborhood-by-neighborhood summary of the challenges and “potential moves” for the six areas, culled from the Gehl presentation:

  1. Complete Clematis. Challenges: Clematis’ eastern and western edges could use some love. On the west, crossing Tamarind Avenue from the Tri-Rail station is difficult, and the end of Clematis has little shade or pedestrian interest. On the east, everyone loves the waterfront but it’s empty most of the time, there’s no way to  interact with the water, no shade and few everyday activities. Recommendations: Create an artistic gateway tot he city at the TriRail Station; make Tamarind easier for pedestrians by adding a signal and pedestrian islands; Add shading to make walk up Clematis from the station more comfortable; run bike lanes from Tri-Rail to Rosemary Avenue; String lighting from Tri-Rail to the waterfront; add movable seating to the Flagler Drive green, so people can follow the shade; make the FEC rail and Quadrille Boulevard intersection feel safe and comfortable; widen the waterfront park by taking under-used space from Flagler Drive and install docks that step down to the water. Include eye-catching lighting to draw people to the waterfront.
  2. Historic Northwest. Challenges: Need to stitch this neighborhood and downtown back together. Banyan Boulevard acts as a barrier, too many dark sidewalks, sidewalk obstructions, lack of shade and few things to do. Getting downtown on foot is tough. Rosemary Avenue, once commercial heart of Historic NW, has fallen into vacancy and disrepair. Need to leverage city’s investment in the Sunset Lounge, the historic jazz bar, and set stage to renew Rosemary as a ‘Main Street.’ Recommendations: Create a gateway to the neighborhood at Banyan and Rosemary, with art and bright lighting and redesign intersection to make it safer and more appealing. Paint vacant buildings and sidewalk obstructions bright colors to create an eye-catching pathway on Rosemary. Install artistic lighting along Rosemary leading from Clematis to the Sunset Lounge. Install traffic calming and pedestrian and cyclist improvements on Rosemary. Create a ‘Vacancy Lab’ to test different uses for vacant lots such as sports fields, community garden, food truck pop-ups, plant nursery, tree grove. Consider adding trolley stop. Improve connection across the tracks and to the water along 3rd Street.
  3. 15th Street: Safety and comfort from school to pools. Challenges: 15th crosses both railroads, connecting schools with Pleasant City, Gaines Park and the waterfront. Need to make 15th “a truly great pedestrian and bike street that is safe and enjoyable for school children and all WPBers.” Recommendations: Promote walking and biking to school with mural-painting and other events and traffic school for kids. Add shade, lighting, continuous bike lanes, improve intersections, add ‘rest stops’ with seating, shade, ‘playful interventions,’ bike pumps and the like.
  4. Pleasant City: Challenges: It’s a food desert, with few outlets for affordable food, whether in stores or restaurants. Northwood Village has great restaurants but they’re too expensive for many neighbors. Getting to the water from Northwood and Pleasant City is challenging because it feels far. Recommendations: Give Pleasant city residents something to do in Blum Park while helping address shortage of affordable food in the neighborhood. Connect the neighborhood to the water and Currie Park while creating a new destination: the Sunset Pools. Sunset Pools would be a ‘mobile harbor bath in the Intracoastal Waterway that allows people to get into the water and can be moved to serve different neighborhoods. Add activities to Blum Park by building barbecue pits, a weekly or biweekly food truck program with local entrepreneurs, add picnic tables and shade. Build on the community garden on Spruce and connect to a kitchen. Create a community/commercial kitchen in a vacant building or repurposed shipping container to supply the food truck program and provide job training. Install pedestrian and bike improvements on Spruce, leading from Northwood to Merry Place. Add a trolley stop at Dixie Highway and Currie Park.
  5. Tamarind Avenue: Challenges: It’s a commercial street plagued by vacancies, illicit activities, a tough stigma, lack of lighting and shade. Locals say bus stops are uncomfortable, and though there are hang-out spots near corner stores, there is nowhere to sit and nothing to do. Recommendations:  Bring amenities to the Coleman Park neighborhood along Tamarind, where no one should ever be more than two minutes from comfort, services or neighborhood shops. Create clusters of activity around existing, organic hang-out areas at corner stores and bus stops and put eyes on the street by adding services the neighborhood needs. Add shade, lighting, seating. Add ‘pop-ups’ to energize Tamarind, such as a mobile library, WiFi stations, bike repair shop, computer access points, outdoor exercise equipment, street games. Make cycling between 15th and 23rd streets more comfortable by clearly marking that this is “a neighborhood green street/commercial main street.”
  6. Howard Park: Challenges: The under-used northern end of the park is potentially a great amenity for the southern part of downtown, but with Okeechobee Boulevard in the middle, it’s hard to navigate between the park and downtown.  Recommendations: Improve Okeechobee crossings by tailoring crossing times to pedestrians, widening ends of medians to make the crossings shorter. Add shade, lighting and other pedestrian improvements between CityPlace and Howard Park. Add a SkyBike bicycle rental station. Create “a playful connection” through the park, with features like Los Trompos, the big “tops” formerly located on the waterfront. Try putting a trolley stop at the park, and if there’s demand, a trolley stop at the Art Walk in the Warehouse District.

 

 

 

 

West Palm tightens downtown curfew

(Thomas Cordy / The Palm Beach Post)

Minors are now banned from downtown streets after 10 p.m., seven days a week.

The City Commission this week took its final vote to tighten the curfew, which previously started at 11 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

 

The commission tried out the earlier curfew during a three-month pilot program, which ended Feb. 17.

By land and sea, boat show to crowd downtown, close roads and docks

The 32nd Annual Palm Beach International Boat Show is coming March 23-26, and that means boaters and motorists need to be aware of upcoming changes in the rules of the road, some of them already in effect.

The city docks are closed through March 31 at 5 p.m., as are Northbound Flagler Drive between Lakeview Avenue and Banyan Boulevard. Two southbound lanes of Flagler are open, at least until next weekend.

Today, — Monday — through Wednesday, March 29 at 5 p.m., Narcissus Avenue will be closed between Evernia and Datura streets.

Next Sunday, March 19, starting at 6 a.m., Southbound Flagler will close between Lakeview and Banyan. (So, Flagler Drive will be closed northbound and southbound.)

Southbound Flagler Drive will reopen March 28 at 5 p.m., and on Friday, March 31 at 5 p.m. all lanes of Flagler reopen.

Clematis by Night festivities on Thursday, March 23 and the waterfront GreenMarket on Saturday, March 25, are canceled.

All city garages, including at Banyan and the courthouse, will remain open.

The boat show will feature more than $1.2 billion  worth of boats,  yachts  and accessories.

The boats range from 8-foot inflatables to power boats, fishing boats, center consoles, bow riders, personal watercraft and super yachts over 150 feet, the latter which you are free to purchase and donate to your favorite journalist. Also at the show: pre-owned yachts, electronics and accessories, seminars, kids fishing clinics, exotic cars and live music.

Kids Night In tonight, Kids Day out event coming

rapids1

This, from the City of West Palm Beach:

The City of West Palm Beach Department of Parks and Recreation’s South Olive Community Center, 345 Summa St., is offering two activities that parents, and kids aged 5-11, will love.

Kids Day Out is an opportunity for your kids to have fun while you run errands or take time for yourself.  Register them for a Saturday at places like Calypso Bay, Rapids Water Park, the movies, bowling, bounce houses and museums.  Kids Day Out will be held Jan. 28 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., for $12 for residents and $15 for non-residents.

Kids’ Night In is an opportunity for parents to enjoy a Friday night out, while kids engage in games, crafts, dinner and movies. Your child will be well looked after and you can have a little “me time”. Kids Night In will be held TONIGHT, Jan. 20, from 5:30 – 10 p.m. for $12 for residents, $15 for non-residents.

Register online at www.westpalmparks.org or in person at South Olive Community Center.  Register early to reserve your space.  Proof of residency is required at the time of registration.

For more information, please call 561-804-4945, visit www.wpb.org/parks.